Labyrinth Soundworks

Mixing & Mastering Engineer

Labyrinth Soundworks on SoundBetter

I am Chris Parkes, please allow me to put my experience to work in bringing your musical vision to life. I have been working mainly freelance for the past twenty years mixing, editing, and mastering. I work in a private studio in the North Shore of Massachusetts using Logic Pro and a fully in-the-box solution of modern and 'vintage' software.

My main focus is mixing, but I am happy to provide editing, production, mastering, or even session playing on your tracks. Your success is very important to me, so we will work together to create your song/projects where you are happy with the end product. You may reference my personal project by looking up Labyrinth Soundworks.

I can work from Logic or Reaper projects or directly from stems. Always make sure to provide the highest quality audio files (minimum allowed is 24 bits, 44.1 kHz WAV or AIFF).

Click the 'Contact' above to get in touch. Looking forward to hearing from you.

Interview with Labyrinth Soundworks

  1. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  2. A: Mixed a gospel album - I have always felt there was a huge difference in how these types of songs sounded in person compared to recorded (the former better). In this case I feel we bridged the gap.

  3. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  4. A: Finishing Resonant Reflections second album, New Life

  5. Q: Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?

  6. A: Not at the moment

  7. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  8. A: Digital! You can work on a ton of projects at one time to stay fresh, can use a ton of analog emulations (which would often cost thousands), and the ability to work much quicker than in analog.

  9. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  10. A: I promise to give it my all and to work with you until it is what you want.

  11. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  12. A: The variety and the ability to do what I love.

  13. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  14. A: We do not have a drummer, can you add drums? I am not the best drummer, but can work my way around software drums pretty well. I can offer to add virtual drums from Logic Pro or Addictive Drums, which will sound as good or better than a live drummer.

  15. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  16. A: That anyone can achieve a great mix from a bedroom. While possible it takes years of practice and even then it is always a moving target.

  17. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  18. A: Describe how you want the song to be in the end. Do you have a reference of another song that is similar to how you want this to be? Is there anything that I cannot change or you do not want?

  19. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  20. A: Record the best that you can at good levels (roughly -10 dBFS peaks). Re-record the sound if it is not your best. Edit as much as you are able to in order to create a tight and locked in performance. Render each track at unity volume and pan (0 on the fader/knob) at 24 bit/44.1+ KHz audio stems (keep mono as mono and stereo as stereo if possible). Leave plug-ins (other than virtual instruments) off of the stems and no master buss processing. If you have a general vision for the project/song talk to me about that and if possible provide a rough mix of how you want the song to sound.

  21. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  22. A: Mac Book Pro Audient Interface Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro headphones Brainsworx SSL 4000 E console plug-in Waves NX

  23. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  24. A: Started around 1995 on personal work and for school bands, spent some time in audio school in early 2000’s, then began freelancing projects.

  25. Q: How would you describe your style?

  26. A: Dynamic yet refined with a taste of the past

  27. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  28. A: Andrew Scheps ... because the guy is bold and always tries to improve on his next mix. He is genius in how he uses parallel compression.

  29. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  30. A: Listen first and then use visual tools (ie. Analyzers, meters) second.

  31. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  32. A: Rock and pop, but some country and R & B

  33. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  34. A: I know I can always be better as a mixer, producer, or musician and because of that I always push myself. Pride is of no benefit to me.

  35. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  36. A: I have been mixing personally and professionally for more than 20 years. I am a musician myself, which helps with arrangements and the balance between sounds. I have a deep love of the music from the past, but also enjoy how bold and deep the newer music can be. I try to approach everything with a less is more approach to allow the true essence of the song to come through without adding 100+ parts to make something somewhat sound nice.

  37. Q: What's your typical work process?

  38. A: 1. Listening to the artists vision and plan for the song/project 2. Listen to the song multiple times while making level and pan adjustments 3. Gain stage 4. Edit as needed (syncing parts, fixing pitch issues) 5. Begin applying EQ, compression, and other processes 6. Add verbs, delays 7. Rough listen on outside systems (large, small, ear buds) 8. Refine mix 9. Add automation 10. Add ear candy (ie. Vocal throws, phasers) 11. Final tweaks (typically 2-3 per project) 12. Render/Bounce 13. Master of requested

  39. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  40. A: I work fully in the box once recorded. All projects handled on the latest Mac Book Pro 16 using a mix of Audient and Apogee interfaces, JBL monitors, Presonus Faderport, and Beyerdynamic and Sony headphones. In the box I mainly work on Logic Pro X and use various plug-ins, including Brainworx SSL 4000 E and other console channel strips, Blackbox Audio HG-2, many Waves plugs, and Black Rooster Audio plugs. My room is treated, but not too much to allow enough natural room sound to allow nice recordings and a clear sound while mixing.

  41. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  42. A: Andrew Scheps, Vance Powell, The Beatles, Chris Cornell, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin

  43. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  44. A: Mixing from rough stems, but also will fix mixes, master or perform editing on occasion.

  45. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  46. A: Mixed a gospel album - I have always felt there was a huge difference in how these types of songs sounded in person compared to recorded (the former better). In this case I feel we bridged the gap.

  47. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  48. A: Finishing Resonant Reflections second album, New Life

  49. Q: Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?

  50. A: Not at the moment

  51. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  52. A: Digital! You can work on a ton of projects at one time to stay fresh, can use a ton of analog emulations (which would often cost thousands), and the ability to work much quicker than in analog.

  53. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  54. A: I promise to give it my all and to work with you until it is what you want.

  55. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  56. A: The variety and the ability to do what I love.

  57. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  58. A: We do not have a drummer, can you add drums? I am not the best drummer, but can work my way around software drums pretty well. I can offer to add virtual drums from Logic Pro or Addictive Drums, which will sound as good or better than a live drummer.

  59. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  60. A: That anyone can achieve a great mix from a bedroom. While possible it takes years of practice and even then it is always a moving target.

  61. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  62. A: Describe how you want the song to be in the end. Do you have a reference of another song that is similar to how you want this to be? Is there anything that I cannot change or you do not want?

  63. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  64. A: Record the best that you can at good levels (roughly -10 dBFS peaks). Re-record the sound if it is not your best. Edit as much as you are able to in order to create a tight and locked in performance. Render each track at unity volume and pan (0 on the fader/knob) at 24 bit/44.1+ KHz audio stems (keep mono as mono and stereo as stereo if possible). Leave plug-ins (other than virtual instruments) off of the stems and no master buss processing. If you have a general vision for the project/song talk to me about that and if possible provide a rough mix of how you want the song to sound.

  65. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  66. A: Mac Book Pro Audient Interface Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro headphones Brainsworx SSL 4000 E console plug-in Waves NX

  67. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  68. A: Started around 1995 on personal work and for school bands, spent some time in audio school in early 2000’s, then began freelancing projects.

  69. Q: How would you describe your style?

  70. A: Dynamic yet refined with a taste of the past

  71. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  72. A: Andrew Scheps ... because the guy is bold and always tries to improve on his next mix. He is genius in how he uses parallel compression.

  73. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  74. A: Listen first and then use visual tools (ie. Analyzers, meters) second.

  75. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  76. A: Rock and pop, but some country and R & B

  77. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  78. A: I know I can always be better as a mixer, producer, or musician and because of that I always push myself. Pride is of no benefit to me.

  79. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  80. A: I have been mixing personally and professionally for more than 20 years. I am a musician myself, which helps with arrangements and the balance between sounds. I have a deep love of the music from the past, but also enjoy how bold and deep the newer music can be. I try to approach everything with a less is more approach to allow the true essence of the song to come through without adding 100+ parts to make something somewhat sound nice.

  81. Q: What's your typical work process?

  82. A: 1. Listening to the artists vision and plan for the song/project 2. Listen to the song multiple times while making level and pan adjustments 3. Gain stage 4. Edit as needed (syncing parts, fixing pitch issues) 5. Begin applying EQ, compression, and other processes 6. Add verbs, delays 7. Rough listen on outside systems (large, small, ear buds) 8. Refine mix 9. Add automation 10. Add ear candy (ie. Vocal throws, phasers) 11. Final tweaks (typically 2-3 per project) 12. Render/Bounce 13. Master of requested

  83. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  84. A: I work fully in the box once recorded. All projects handled on the latest Mac Book Pro 16 using a mix of Audient and Apogee interfaces, JBL monitors, Presonus Faderport, and Beyerdynamic and Sony headphones. In the box I mainly work on Logic Pro X and use various plug-ins, including Brainworx SSL 4000 E and other console channel strips, Blackbox Audio HG-2, many Waves plugs, and Black Rooster Audio plugs. My room is treated, but not too much to allow enough natural room sound to allow nice recordings and a clear sound while mixing.

  85. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  86. A: Andrew Scheps, Vance Powell, The Beatles, Chris Cornell, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin

  87. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  88. A: Mixing from rough stems, but also will fix mixes, master or perform editing on occasion.

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GenresSounds Like
  • Resonant Reflections
Gear Highlights
  • Adam monitored
  • Focusrite Clarett
  • Yamaha S80
  • Beyerdynamic DT990 Pro
  • Sony MDR7506
  • Mac Book Pro
  • Logic Pro
  • REAPER
  • Brainworx SSL 4000 E/N Console/Focusrite
  • Waves plug-ins
  • Black Rooster plug-ins
  • Black Box Analog Design HG-2
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